Report: Global E-Mobility Market Set to Reach $62.2 billion in 2025

Global e-mobility market is set to reach $62.2 billion in annual revenue in 2025, according to the latest report from Navigant Research.

The primary technologies studied are electric buses (e-buses); electric-powered two-wheel (e-PTW) vehicles such as electric bicycles (e-bikes) and electric scooters (e-scooters); plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) in shared mobility programs; and electric vehicle (EV) charging infrastructure. Unless EVs specifically address smart city mobility, such as PEVs used in carsharing services or neighborhood EV (NEV) programs, they are not analyzed in depth in this report.

Market Issues

Consumers around the globe are increasingly searching for new products and services that will enable improved mobility in and around city centers. Simultaneously, cities are strategizing on how to reduce traffic congestion and meet aggressive climate action plans. A key challenge for cities in the 21st century is how larger numbers of people can be incentivized to move away from personal cars for motorized transportation and toward cleaner mobility devices and services.

Electric mobility (e-mobility) devices are uniquely positioned to fill these voids and provide both consumers and city governments with a multitude of solutions. E-mobility devices reduce vehicle emissions and noise while improving personal mobility in cities—something personal EV ownership cannot achieve on its own. While EVs generally provide a cleaner form of energy over their gasoline counterparts, they do not inherently improve traffic congestion. However, if EVs are part of a carsharing or NEV program, they can solve both problems at the same time. E-buses have great potential to positively affect urban air quality since city buses mostly operate in dense urban centers. Although e-PTWs are still considered to be in the early adopter phase in the United States, they are commonly used as commuting devices in Asia Pacific and many Western European countries, displacing millions of cars from city roads every year.

All e-mobility devices are linked by one common technology: EV charging infrastructure. While charging requirements vary between different devices and technologies, they all need access to convenient, reliable, and affordable charging networks.
The e-mobility industry is driven by increased urbanization, improving battery technology, national e-mobility plans, and city energy policy. Nevertheless, low consumer awareness and gasoline prices, a lack of long-term city visions or strategies, and high purchase prices (compared to conventional technologies) are still restricting sales in some markets.

Market Forecasts

Revenue generated by global e-mobility devices is expected to more than double from 2016 to 2025, growing from a $25.6 billion market in 2016 to $62.2 billion by 2025. E-mobility device revenue is expected to grow at a strong compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 10.3% throughout the forecast period.

While Asia Pacific holds enormous market share in terms of e-mobility device sales and e-mobility battery pack energy capacity, the region is significantly less dominant in terms of e-mobility device revenue (74% market share in 2016). Average purchase prices for all e-mobility technologies (particularly e-PTWs and e-buses) are much lower in Asia Pacific compared to North America and Europe. This results in a revenue picture that is more evenly distributed on a regional basis compared to annual unit device sales and
battery capacity.

E-PTWs are expected to account for 69% of e-mobility device revenue in 2016 (e-bikes 62% and e-scooters 7%). E-bus revenue is climbing quickly and is expected to surpass e-PTW revenue levels by 2022 due to vastly higher purchase prices. Meanwhile, E-PTWs are expected to see their market share of global e-mobility revenue shrink to 43% by 2025. Annual e-mobility device sales of higher priced e-mobility devices such as e-buses, PEVs in shared mobility services, and electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE) units are expected to grow more quickly. EVSE unit sales are expected to grow at the quickest pace of any e-mobility device over the forecast period (20.4% CAGR).

global-emobility-market-2016

Annual E-Mobility Device Revenue by Technology, World Markets: 2016-2025

INMOTION NEW PRODUCTS P1 E-BIKE LAUNCH 2016 IN BERLIN

INMOTION TECHNOLOGIES CO.,LTD (hereinafter referred to INMOTION) has successfully held an European new product release meeting on the theme of ‘Enjoyable Tour· Free Living ’at Crown Plaza Berlin City Center.

inmotion p1

inmotion p1

For this conference, INMOTION has unveiled three brand new products, E-bike P1, E-scooter L8 and hover board HI. In addition to P1, CEO Vic Chou announced that the crowd funding on Jingdong will launch on 06. September in China.

inmotion p1
inmotion p1

It’s the first time that INMOTION holds an official new product release meeting in Europe. Besides the new products launch,Vic Chou has also reviewed the history of INMOTION from 2012 to now and also stated concepts of INMOTION to new guests during the conference. Some of excellent global distributors has shared their stories about INMOTION. Meanwhile, four awards of excellent global distributors went to  French,Ukrainian,Austria and Spanish.

inmotion p1

Most of Business partners show great interests about these three new products. They are expected that INMOTION could develop more new products.

inmotion p1

wheelive will make a hands-on when P1 release!

INMOTION NEW PRODUCTS P1 E-BIKE LAUNCH 2016 IN BERLIN

INMOTION TECHNOLOGIES CO.,LTD (hereinafter referred to INMOTION) has successfully held an European new product release meeting on the theme of ‘Enjoyable Tour· Free Living ’at Crown Plaza Berlin City Center.

20160906113008_47272

20160906113454_59238

For this conference, INMOTION has unveiled three brand new products, E-bike P1, E-scooter L8 and hover board HI. In addition to P1, CEO Vic Chou announced that the crowd funding on Jingdong will launch on 06. September in China.

It’s the first time that INMOTION holds an official new product release meeting in Europe. Besides the new products launch,Vic Chou has also reviewed the history of INMOTION from 2012 to now and also stated concepts of INMOTION to new guests during the conference. Some of excellent global distributors has shared their stories about INMOTION. Meanwhile, four awards of excellent global distributors went to  French,Ukrainian,Austria and Spanish.

20160906120000_19196

Most of Business partners show great interests about these three new products. They are expected that INMOTION could develop more new products.

20160906133228_72963

wheelive will make a hands-on when P1 release!

Why lithium-ion batteries go up in flames

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Samsung Galaxy Note 7

The burning lithium-ion batteries that caused a massive recall of Samsung Galaxy Note 7 smartphones highlight the conundrum tech companies face as they look for more powerful, lightweight and easily recharged batteries to power myriad consumer devices.

Lithium-ion batteries burst onto the scene in the early 1990s when they first appeared in hand-held video cameras. Since then they’ve been used to power everything from jets’ electrical systems to cars to the smartphones carried by billions. They’ve also caused fires and mass recalls, from last year’s hoverboard flameout to the grounding of Boeing 787s.

The batteries are attractive to device makers because they can store relatively large amounts of energy in a small space, said Jason Croy, a physicist in the Electrochemical Energy Storage department at Argonne National Labs in Lemont, Ill.

“Without Li-ion, there very likely would be no smart phones, tablets, laptops, et cetera,” he said.

Lithium-ion batteries are no more inherently dangerous than any other battery, but they are more energy dense. And the more energy stored, the potentially more dangerous a battery becomes, said Croy.

At the same time, consumers are continually demanding more power for their devices.

“They want to do more with their phones, with the laptops, they want to drive 200 miles on a charge in their electric cars,” he said.

That means lithium-ion batteries are increasingly called upon to hold more energy. The vast majority do it safely, but poorly-designed, faulty or counterfeit batteries can sometimes burst into flame, explode or simply overheat.

According to Samsung, a “battery cell issue” is to blame for for the 35 confirmed cases of the smartphones catching fire or exploding.

The batteries work by moving lithium particles between a negative and positive electrode to charge and discharge. To allow those particles to move easily, they’re suspended in pressurized cells inside the batteries filled with volatile and flammable chemicals.

The movement of the particles causes heat as the battery is charged and discharged. If the battery was badly designed or improperly used or installed, that heat can ignite the chemicals, causing flames or explosions.

Damage to the thin walls that keep the different parts of the battery separate can also lead to short circuits and a corresponding heat buildup.

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A burned hoverboard. The Consumer Product Safety Commission recalled faulty devices due to problems with their batteries in 2015. (Photo: Consumer Product Safety Commission)

While overall very safe, the literally billions of lithium-ion batteries in use worldwide mean there have been several newsworthy failures over time.

In June, HP issued a recall for some HP and Compaq laptop computer after it was found that their battery packs could overhead.

Self-balancing hoverboards powered by often poorly-designed or installed lithium-ion batteries have been responsible for more than 100 fires. Half a million of them were recalled by the Consumer Product Safety Commission.

In 2013 fires in two 787 Dreamliner jets caused by a short circuit in lithium ion batteries led Boeing to redesign the plane so that each battery was housed inside an insulated, vented and fireproof steel box.

Lithium-ion batteries were also implicated in at least two fires in Tesla electric cars after they ran over road debris that damaged the battery pack under the vehicle. The car company added three underbody shields to the Model S to further protect the electric cars’ batteries from impacts.

via:usatoday